Initial Research
Below are some first looks at
the potential style and direction
I could take with this project.
I think what's important for me to
consider with this designing type
is my background concern that -
unless a typeface is different or
ideally innovative, what is its 
relevancy or use?
Ideas Development
I'm really keen on this poster to the
left - I think I'd be interesting to
explore the idea of not just a 
pixelated font which are everywhere
but instead an almost unmastered,
no-modular typeface that tests
legibility.
Type Workshop
Working with type off the computer 
and instead with pen and paper was, although frustrating, really enjoyable
and quite therapeutic. You learn to respect type a lot more and 
understand it's structure, some
drawings below were very testing 
and often had outcomes that felt 
too rough and raw. 

Some though, especially the san-serif styles, I was really satisfied with and 
has now left me tempted to design something more traditional 
and technical.

Research
After the workshop drawing and 
wanting to try something traditional
and potentially sans-serif, I was really
inspired by the initial sketches of
Futura by Paul Renner and excited as to
where the sans serif typeface could
have gone.

I feel by remaining geometric yet
trying some more unique approaches
with some letters, I can still achieve
an experimental, innovative font.
Research
Looking at some more modern
examples of geometric san serifs,
I identified GT Walsheim and Modern
Era as perfect influences for  a 
framework. Px Grotesk on the other 
hand offers some more interesting
angles, more square that could 
feature in my typeface.
Research
Below are some really interesting
glyphs that display more almost
unpredictable geometric structures.
New Paris Skyline by Swiss Typefaces
Wigrum by Production Type
Favorit by DINAMO
Dr by Production Type
Favorit by DINAMO
GT Walsheim by Grilli Type
New Paris Skyline by Swiss Typefaces
Dr by Production Type
Design Development
Starting with the lowercase as I can
show off more character in these 
glyphs, I experimented with some
pivotal shapes, seen in the square
form of the f, h , m etc. then with the
angled and more circular based
letters. Also are some experiments
where I have the dilemma of whether
to individuality with characters such
as the c or the keep them quite vanilla
in order to maintain consistency.
Design Development
Starting with the lowercase as I can
show off more character in these 
glyphs, I experimented with some
pivotal shapes, seen in the square
form of the f, h , m etc. then with the
angled and more circular based
letters. Also are some experiments
where I have the dilemma of whether
to individuality with characters such
as the c or the keep them quite vanilla
in order to maintain consistency.
Poster Development
I wanted to display the geometry in 
my typeface, first I tried this by categorising the characters by their 
form: from angular to circular, though
I liked the concept of splitting up the
font, I couldn't take the poster to a
space that felt interesting to look at.

Another idea was to only use the form
of a few glyphs to explicitly show the
geometric structure, the middle 
design below I like and maybe regret
not taking further as I am not too
satisfied with my final poster choice.
Final Outcome
The final typeface, I called 'Hugo'
for it's efficiency in exhibiting the
foundational structural forms of the
face. The poster was designed to
say Hugo whilst feeling, layered aesthetically and being geometric, though honestly I want it to say more,
be more interesting and have 
more depth. 

The Typeface itself, in the specimen,
I am pleased with, whilst it includes
some interesting glyphs that make
the font unique, it is nicely pulled together with some traditional forms
too. It was fun to design when I 
expected the opposite with type and
has left more motivated to continue 
to improve it, add some numbers and
potentially some alternative options.

More Work

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